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Media training

Media Relations holds six-hour workshops to help campus faculty and staff become more effective and comfortable with reporters and interviews. The sessions cover such topics as what to do when a reporter calls, how to develop effective talking points, and specific skills for broadcast interviews. Trainees also participate in on-camera mock interviews.  The workshops are held twice a year Due to limited space and resources, the workshops are primarily reserved for those who interact—or anticipate interacting—on a regular basis with news media.

To inquire about upcoming media training sessions, contact Roxanne Makasdjian, manager of broadcast communications, at 642-6051, or roxannem@berkeley.edu.

Here's a sampling of comments about the media training workshops:  

"The level of expertise and the quality of instruction and advice offered was outstanding. Clearly we were being coached by pros, and I left feeling well-prepared and much less stressed about my next media encounter!"
— Christine Trost, associate specialist, Institute for the Study of Social Change

"This was perhaps the most helpful training course I've ever taken on campus. It was loaded with practical information that is immediately applicable to my position."
— Mark Freiberg, director of UC Berkeley's Office of Environment, Health & Safety

"Thanks for the great training -- This was a real bargain."
— AnnaLee Saxenian, dean and professor, School of Information

"Six hours here saves me three weeks of damage control! I would be happy to attend a follow-up course on advanced topics."
— Professor Albert Pisano, faculty head, Operations Excellence program

"I benefited greatly from the methodology you presented and the 'before and after' interviews. How I wished I had known you (and all the material you covered) earlier, 15 years earlier!"
— Connie Chang-Hasnain, professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences

"Very comprehensive information for TV and radio interviews, Very competent and friendly instructors."
— Emmanuel Saez, professor, Department of Economics

 
Contact Media Relations